Riverside Gardens

Sunny June continues, showcasing gardens all around me in the Seacoast region of southern Maine and coastal New Hampshire. I’m back to Salem today, and then off on other adventures, but first I wanted to share some photographs of gardens along (or not too far away from) the York and Piscataqua Rivers, including an absolutely stunning private garden which is cultivated by friends of my parents. It is behind a gate, which reveals nothing of the wonders within, so I feel very fortunate to have been granted access: the garden was in its last stage of late-spring bloom, but I’m sure you can discern its full-blown glory even with my amateur photographs. A bit further down (up?) the York River, the “old-fashioned” garden at the Elizabeth Perkins House, now the main office of the Old York Historical Society, has always been one of my favorite York gardens: this year it is untended due to the pandemic, but I have no doubt it will rise again.

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20200620_134748A spectacular private garden along the York River and the Elizabeth Perkins House and grounds.

Over in Portsmouth, I found refuge from a largely-maskless crowd on Juneteenth in the city’s pocket gardens and on the grounds of the Governor Langdon House, which belongs to Historic New England. So again, not a lot of garden-tending, but good bones!

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20200619_135210Portsmouth gardens on Juneteenth.


6 responses to “Riverside Gardens

  • Laura

    Lovely, thanks so much for showing us. Love the colors and such a treat for us to see the “garden behind the gate” as well.

    I’ve been impressed how comforting and uplifting gardens have been during this difficult time. I am so grateful to have https://tregaron.org/ a woodland conservancy and the Klingle Valley path that runs next to it http://www.klinglevalleytrail.com/ almost out my back door. And these woodlands have their very own “climate” even in the heat and humidity of Washington DC. šŸ™‚

    Thanks again for this blog. It has been a comfort too with all its topics and history!

    Some time this summer you have to tell us what you are reading. I always love your book recommendations!

    • daseger

      Hello Laura! Hope you are well. I’ve got two posts on books coming up–one on my Suffrage sources, and the other is my summer reading list. Quite a variety of texts in both!

  • Anne Sterling

    Ahhh – Beautiful York harbor and a secret garden too. Have you ever checked out the “The Fells” garden near Mt. Sunapee in NH? A perfectly rocky and wonderful garden on the shores of Lake Sunapee, summer home of the John Hays family – bonus options to cruise Lake Sunapee and chair lift ride up Mt. Sunapee for sweeping vistas. The simple and profound joys of summah in New England make the humidity worth it.

    • daseger

      Yes, I went there last year—there’s a post somewhere on here! I wasn’t really impressed with the gardens, as it was the summer doldrums when I was there, but the vista was amazing.

  • Lou Sirianni

    Stunning…..Thank you for sharing

  • Helen Breen

    Hi Donna,

    Thank you for the wonderful journey through York gardens. Love the lavender.

    As the poet says,

    And what is so rare as a day in June?
    Then, if ever, come perfect days;
    Then Heaven tries earth if it be in tune,
    And over it softly her warm ear lays;
    Whether we look, or whether we listen,
    We hear life murmur, or see it glisten ā€¦
    ā€•James Russell Lowell

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