Southern Exposure, Part Two

Just finishing up with vacation pictures and notes before I move on to other topics this coming week: lots going on in Salem, and I also have a bunch of historical and horticultural things I’m working on. First of all, I must say that Charleston is of course a lovely city, I didn’t mean to cast aspersions on it in my previous post (people keep coming up to me!): I just preferred Savannah slightly more on this particular vacation. This was likely due more to my mood than anything else. Charleston was quite crowded when we were there, with the Spoleto festival just wrapping up, and we never really found quite the right restaurant or bar: the celebrated Husk was right near our inn, so we felt we needed to go farther afield, which was probably a mistake. And while Charleston is full of great art galleries and antique stores, King Street is all chain stores, and I couldn’t find the perfect little local shop that I’m always looking for. But the crowds and the sun drove us into the really interesting Charleston Museum, which is not much to look at on the outside but full of lots of curiosities in the inside (if arranged in rather old-fashioned exhibits): I continue to be saddened by Salem’s lack of a similar venue. And there are few avenues than can compete with the Battery and Tradd Street: very few.

A bit more of Savannah. My favorite house and a really neat shop: Prospector Co.

Savannah Favorite Townhouse

Savannah Prospector Co

Southern Exposure 208

In Charleston. Tradd Street, a “Charleston Door” opening up to the porch, the Battery, King Street, many Massachusetts-made guns in the Charleston Museum!

Charleston windowbox

Charleston Tradd Street

Charleston door

Charleston Battery

Charleston 2

Charleston Museum


2 responses to “Southern Exposure, Part Two

  • Patricia Zaido

    So sorry to hear that King Street is all no change stores. H&M how sad. I wouldn’t like that either!

    Like

  • Cotton Boll Conspiracy

    I’ve spent a lot more time in Charleston than Savannah, but have also noticed a considerable difference between the two. Charleston almost seems to have become historically commercialized, if there is such a thing. Savannah, in the handful of times I’ve visited, seems more authentic.

    Now, there are plenty of “authentic” places in Charleston, but they’re not on the “tourist trail” and you probably wouldn’t want to be caught there after dark. But that doesn’t make them any less interesting.

    Like

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