Fabricating Revere’s Ride

Because of his entrepreneurial engravings, his silverwork, portraits of him and by him, his storied ride, and his boundless brand, Paul Revere as always been the most material of our Founding Fathers: he didn’t just act, he produced, and after his legendary life was over he continued to be a focus and force of production. As we head into (a rather early) Patriots Day weekend, I am thinking about Revere, mostly in reference to Grant Wood’s 1931 painting The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere, which supposedly aims to highlight the mythology overwhelming the event from the publication of Longfellow’s 1863 poem. The painting is so very accessible, however, that I fear that it simply reinforces Revere’s singular ride, or it has just become an aesthetic object: Wood himself transformed the image into a textile design (in which the rider gets lost in the landscape) for the Association of American Artists, and now you can even buy laminated placemats of it on Etsy! Revere the Midnight Rider was featured in a design by Anton Refregier in another “Pioneer Pathways” design, issued in several colorways by Riverdale Fabrics in 1952. A few decades earlier, Walter Mitschke also included Paul Revere’s ride in drawings for his “Early America” series of textile designs produced by R. Mallinson and Company.

Revere Wood

Reveres Ride of Paul Revere Textile

Revere the Rider Pioneer Pathways

Revere Red

Reveres Ride Mallinson

Grant Wood, The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere, 1931, Metropolitan Museum of Art. Textile designs by Grant Wood and Anton Refregier for the Association of American Artists, produced by Riverdale Fabrics as part of the “Pioneer Pathways” series, 1952, Cooper Hewitt Museum; Walter Mitschke’s drawings for the Mallinson Company, 1927, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. 

Obviously Paul Revere’s Ride is larger than the man himself in terms of its myriad representations in text, image, and fabric, but I think the most effective displays are those that were created close to home: Robert Reid’s 1904 mural in the State House, the iconic statue of Cyrus Dallin, the Paul Revere pottery produced by the Saturday Evening Girls Club, all those calendars issued by another institution with a founding- father-affiliation, the John Hancock Life Insurance Company. For a more updated presentation of the route rather than the ride, there is an exhibition of drawings by artist and illustrator Fred Lynch on view now at the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library in Lexington (which used to be called the National Heritage Museum) titled “Paul Revere’s Ride Revisited”.

Massachusetts-State-House-Mural-Paul-Reveres-Ride-Boston-MA-2016-09-26

pp-caproni-and-brother-painted-cast-plaster-relief-panel-paul-reveres-ride (1)

Reveres Ride Tile MFA

Revere Calendars

Robert Reid mural in the Massachusetts State House, 1904, Caproni Brothers plaster bas-relief sculpture, Skinner Auctions, Tile by Paul Revere Pottery of the Saturday Evening Girls Club, 1917 (decorated by Sara Galner), Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; 1889 & 1903 calendars by the John Hancock Life Insurance Company, Historic New England.


One response to “Fabricating Revere’s Ride

  • Helen Breen

    Hi Donna,

    Thanks for yet another timely commemoration piece, today celebrating Paul Revere. I always loved Grant Wood’s interpretation of the famous ride. Recall Ester Forbes’ 1942 Pulitzer winning bio PAUL REVERE AND THE WORLD HE LIVED IN? Back in the day, the female author had to beg her way into the Massachusetts Historical Society to do research for the study.

    If I recall, Forbes minimized the importance of that April 19, 1775 gallop to Revere himself. He was too busy with his huge family and many business interests including a copper mill in Canton.

    A bit of local color – we in Lynnfield celebrate Dr. Martin Herrick, another “Midnight Rider” who spread the alarm in Essex County, and Daniel Townsend who fell on the battle road from Concord. The quaint entry on his headstone in our ancient cemetery reads: “Ap. 19, 1775, died Dan’l Townsend in a battle with the Regulars. He was shot down dead in a moment, in ye 36 year of his age.”

    Like

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